Wheelin’ & Dealin’ with Neal & Vilissa, Episode 3


Welcome to a new episode of the Wheelin’ & Dealin’ podcast on The CSPN!

In this latest episode, co-hosts Neal Carter & Vilissa Thompson engage in political discussion over a number of segments, including:

  • What did the 45 Administration do This Week? (Tom Price resigns as HHS Secretary, Lapse of CHIP)
  • All Politics Is Local (Mass Shooting in Las Vegas, Graham-Cassidy Bill, Attack on Medicaid)
  • All Politics Is Theater (“Do As I Say, Not As I Do” – Rep. Tim Murphy abortion scandal, )
  • Unsung Hero of the Week (Mayor of San Juan Carmen Yulín Cruz )

  • What We’re Reading (see below)

Press play below and enjoy the show!

Listen to the Latest Episode of Wheelin’ & Dealin’

This show will also be available on Apple Podcasts/iTunes , stitcher smart radio, TuneIn radio, SoundCloud, and on Google Play Music! Subscribe to “Wheelin’ & Dealin’“, “The CSPN“, or the “Cold Slither Podcast Network” today & tell a friend (or a foe… or your aunt)!


What We’re Reading

Black Girl Mania: The Graphic Novel uses afro-indigenous futurism and comic book conventions to highlight one of the most commonly misunderstood aspects of bipolar disorder – mania.

“The goal is to offer a representation of bipolar disorder and neurodivergence that is neither demonizing, overly sympathetic, nor fetishizing, and that centers people of color – particularly, black femmes.” – bria royal

Much of her work centralizes black and brown women and femmes as identities in constant solidarity with the elements of our natural world due to parallel experiences of exploitation and resistance. bria is also a 2016 graduate of Northwestern University, where she studied Communications, Film and Psychology, and she uses those fields to guide her approach toward creative modes of storytelling through technological innovation.

http://www.briaroyal.com/black-girl-mania/

Arresting Disabled Bodies

ADAPT’s activists don’t want pity. Pity reduces, dehumanizes. Pitiful people are objects and objects cannot fight. When people with disabilities protest, then, in public and physical ways, they grab hold of old stereotypes and point them back at their creators.

In the United States, disabled bodies are disposable, a guarantee of perpetual second-class status. Whether via institutionalization or sterilization or a lifetime spent bearing “pre-existing condition” about the neck, living as a disabled person in this country has historically meant living subject to a specific bureaucratic evil.

Our market-based health care system is concerned with profit, and it long ago decided that disabled bodies are not worth very much. Whenever that paradigm has shifted, it is because the people who own these bodies have jammed the gears. And they will continue to do so until we collectively agree that healthcare is a human right.

Every arrest, every dragging, every shout, displays strength and not weakness. They merit neither pity nor worship—only respect, and your dedication to a different, fairer world.

https://newrepublic.com/article/145072/arresting-disabled-bodies?utm_content=buffer87181&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Follow and tweet us!

Follow the show on twitter @wheeldealpod.
Keep the conversation going and livetweet us using the hashtag #wheeldealpod

Follow the hosts:
Neal Carter – @nealcarter, @Nu_ViewConsult
Vilissa Thompson – @VilissaThompson,@RampYourVoice

We welcome your feedback!

E-mail the show at wheeldealpod@cspn.us

or

Call the CSPN hotline and leave us a voicemail! (331) 684-7377 that’s (331) 6-VIPERS!

Support the CSPN, click on the sponsor links above!

Thank you for listening to Wheelin’ & Dealin’, a CSPN Media podcast production.

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